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2. Being Unashamed of Our Faith (2 Timothy 1:8-14)

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So do not be ashamed of the testimony about our Lord or of me, a prisoner for his sake, but by God’s power accept your share of suffering for the gospel. He is the one who saved us and called us with a holy calling, not based on our works but on his own purpose and grace, granted to us in Christ Jesus before time began, but now made visible through the appearing of our Savior Christ Jesus. He has broken the power of death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel! For this gospel I was appointed a preacher and apostle and teacher. Because of this, in fact, I suffer as I do. But I am not ashamed, because I know the one in whom my faith is set and I am convinced that he is able to protect what has been entrusted to me until that day. Hold to the standard of sound words that you heard from me and do so with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. Protect that good thing entrusted to you, through the Holy Spirit who lives within us.

2 Timothy 1:8–14 (NET)

How can we be unashamed of our faith in Christ?

When Paul wrote this letter, the persecution of Christians was widespread. They were mocked for their morality and for believing in a crucified man. They were imprisoned and killed for their beliefs. Paul himself was in prison awaiting a death sentence.

In 2 Timothy 1:8, Paul urges Timothy to be unashamed of Christ, Paul and his sufferings, and the gospel, and to join with him in suffering for the faith. Everyone in Asia had already deserted Paul (v. 15). To be associated with the apostle could lead to further persecution—so many denied him.

Temptations to shame are still prominent today. In fact, all of us have probably felt shame about Christ, other believers, or God’s Word at some point. It may be shame about Scriptures’ teachings on homosexuality, abortion, or creation. With the growing antagonism on these topics, many feel a great social pressure to compromise biblical views. Proverbs 29:25 says the “fear of people becomes a snare.” Fear (or shame) traps and stops believers from progressing spiritually. For some, it ultimately pulls them away from Christ; Matthew 13:21 describes how some will fall away because of trouble or persecution over the Word.

The fact that believers are vulnerable to shame is implied by Christ’s declaration in Mark 8:38: “For if anyone is ashamed of me and my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.” To truly follow Christ, we must be unashamed of him and his teachings. Those who are ashamed, Christ will be ashamed of them at his coming. Most likely this means that their shame will prove their lack of true salvation. In Matthew 7:22-23, many professing believers in the last days will declare, “Lord, Lord,” and Christ will reply, “I never knew you.”

This call to be unashamed is especially important as Christ taught that persecution towards believers would increase in the last days. Believers will be hated by all nations because of Christ and consequently many will fall away (Matt 24:9-13). Certainly, we can see this growing animosity happening around the world.

How can we be unashamed of our faith in an antagonistic world? In 2 Timothy 1:8-14, Paul encourages Timothy, and us, to be unashamed of our faith.

Big Question: According to 2 Timothy 1:8-14, how can believers be unashamed of their faith in a world that is antagonistic towards Christ, his people, and his words?

To Be Unashamed, We Must Be Empowered by God’s Spirit

So do not be ashamed of the testimony about our Lord or of me, a prisoner for his sake, but by God’s power accept your share of suffering for the gospel.

2 Timothy 1:8

The conjunction “So” can be translated “Therefore”—referring back to the believer’s divine resources given through the Spirit, as mentioned in the preceding verse. There, Paul says, “For God did not give us a Spirit of fear but of power and love and self-control” (2 Tim 1:7). The Spirit gives us power to be bold with our words, to love those who mock and persecute us, and to discipline our lives unto holiness. We have the same Spirit that filled Christ from the womb, anointed him at his baptism, led him into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil, filled him with power after forty days of fasting, and worked miracles through him. It’s the same Spirit that enabled him to suffer persecution and die on the cross. Through the Spirit, we can stand against temptation and persecution.

Paul says because you have the Spirit, you must not give up, quit, or quiet your witness. The Spirit of God will empower you. Certainly, we see this throughout the book of Acts. Acts 4:31 says, “When they had prayed, the place where they were assembled together was shaken, and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak the word of God courageously.” In Acts 7, the Spirit enabled Stephen to speak boldly and die as the church’s first martyr.

Warren Wiersbe tells the story of an imprisoned Christian about to be burned at the stake. He was afraid that he could not endure the suffering and that he would deny Christ. Wiersbe shares:

One night, he experimented with pain by putting his little finger into the candle flame. It hurt, and he immediately withdrew it. “I will disgrace my Lord,” he said to himself. “I cannot bear the pain.” But when the hour came for him to die, he praised God and gave a noble witness for Jesus Christ. God gave him the power when he needed it, and not before.1

Are you allowing the Spirit to empower you to stand firm in a contentious and ungodly world? He does this as we abide in him through God’s Word, worship, prayer, and obedience (Gal 5:16).

Application Question: In what ways have you seen the persecution of Christians or their beliefs increase?

To Be Unashamed, We Must Accept Suffering as from the Lord

So do not be ashamed of the testimony about our Lord or of me, a prisoner for his sake, but by God’s power accept your share of suffering for the gospel.

2 Timothy 1:8

It must be noted that Paul does not call himself a prisoner of Rome but a prisoner for Christ’s sake. Paul saw his imprisonment as under God’s sovereign control. Rome could do nothing apart from God’s permission. This was similar to Christ’s declaration to Pilate, when he said that Pilate could have no power over him unless it had been given from above (John 19:11). He saw his suffering as part of God’s sovereign plan.

For another example, consider David’s response to his mighty men who wanted to kill Shimei for cursing David, after he lost the kingdom to Absalom. “What do we have in common, you sons of Zeruiah? If he curses because the Lord has said to him, ‘Curse David!’, who can say to him, ‘Why have you done this?’” (2 Sam 16:10). David saw God as in control of even this cursing, which enabled him to endure it faithfully without shame, and this is true for us as well. If we only see Satan, evil people, or a corrupt government, then we won’t faithfully endure. We may become overwhelmed with anger, remorse, fear, or shame—not allowing us to endure the trial faithfully.

To be unashamed, we must accept suffering as from the Lord. This means our sufferings are not random but purposeful—coming from the gracious hand of our God. Philippians 1:29 says, “For it has been granted to you not only to believe in Christ but also to suffer for him.” The word “granted” can also be translated “graced.” In the same way that faith is a gracious gift from God (Eph 2:8-9) so is suffering. It makes us depend on God more and grow in our faith (Rom 5:3-4, James 1:2-3).30

Are you recognizing God’s hand over the difficulties of life, including persecution? That is how Paul, Jesus, and David endured suffering without shame or some other ungodly response.

Application Question: Why is it important to see God as sovereign over evil, including persecution? In what other Scriptures do we see this reality taught (cf. Heb 10:32-34, 12:6-7)? How does this encourage you?

To Be Unashamed, We Must Remember That Others Are Suffering as well

So do not be ashamed of the testimony about our Lord or of me, a prisoner for his sake, but by God’s power accept your share of suffering for the gospel.

2 Timothy 1:8

After Paul mentions his imprisonment, he calls Timothy to accept his share of suffering for the gospel (v. 8). Paul’s mention of his suffering was meant to encourage Timothy to also willingly accept suffering. This is true for us as well. Our sufferings are not unique to us; they are also experienced by Christians throughout the world—many times in a greater way than us.

Have we been rejected by friends for the faith? Have we lost family? Have we been mocked? This is not uncommon. For many throughout the world, being a Christian means to be skipped over for a promotion, to lose a job, to have one’s possessions taken, to be imprisoned, or even to lose one’s life. Over 400 Christians die for the faith every day. This reality must encourage us to be faithful and willing to join in with their sufferings.

First Corinthians 10:13 says,

No trial has overtaken you that is not faced by others. And God is faithful: He will not let you be tried beyond what you are able to bear, but with the trial will also provide a way out so that you may be able to endure it.

First Peter 5:8–9 says,

Be sober and alert. Your enemy the devil, like a roaring lion, is on the prowl looking for someone to devour. Resist him, strong in your faith, because you know that your brothers and sisters throughout the world are enduring the same kinds of suffering.

Peter reasons that we should resist the devil “because” we know that other believers are going through the same sufferings. Remembering this should encourage us to suffer and not be ashamed.

Being Transparent and Vulnerable

As a further application, this reality reminds us of the importance of being transparent and vulnerable. One result of the fall was a lack of transparency. After Adam and Eve sinned, they hid from one another and God. Now mankind has a tendency to hide their sin or struggles out of shame. However, many times we need to share our struggles, not only so we can get help but so we can help others. In 2 Corinthians 1:6, Paul said: “But if we are afflicted, it is for your comfort and salvation; if we are comforted, it is for your comfort that you experience in your patient endurance of the same sufferings that we also suffer.” When others hear about our struggles, often, it encourages them to be faithful in their own.

Are you being vulnerable with others? Or do you keep your trials and struggles to yourself? It’s important for you to share, not just to get help, but also to help others endure.

Application Question: Does the fact that others are suffering for Christ motivate you to be faithful? Why or why not? Why is it important to share our struggles with others?

To Be Unashamed, We Must Remember the Greatness of the Gospel

He is the one who saved us and called us with a holy calling, not based on our works but on his own purpose and grace, granted to us in Christ Jesus before time began, but now made visible through the appearing of our Savior Christ Jesus. He has broken the power of death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel!

2 Timothy 1:9-10

Paul reminds Timothy of the greatness of the gospel in order to encourage him to suffer for it. This thought is similar to Romans 1:16 where Paul said, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is God’s power for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek.” The gospel is so wonderful that we should never be afraid to share it or explain it to others. We should never try to change it, manipulate it, or hide it. It is too great!

Observation Question: What aspects of the gospel’s greatness does Paul focus on in 2 Timothy 1:9-10?

1. The gospel is great because it is the message of salvation.

Paul states that God “saved us” (v. 9). Saved us from what? Through the gospel we are saved from eternal death—meaning eternal punishment in hell. We are also saved from slavery to sin, the world, and Satan. We are now slaves of Christ and righteousness. The gospel is the message of salvation. Thank you, Lord!

2. The gospel is great because it calls us to holiness.

Paul said we were “called” with a “holy calling” (v. 9). Sometimes with the gospel, we only focus on what we’ve been saved from and not saved to. Ephesians 2:10 says, “For we are his workmanship, having been created in Christ Jesus for good works that God prepared beforehand so we may do them.” God has called us to holiness—a life of righteous deeds done in the name of Christ to build God’s kingdom. In 1 Thessalonians 4:7, Paul said, “For God did not call us to impurity but in holiness.”

3. The gospel is great because it demonstrates God’s grace.

Paul says, “not based on our works but on his own purpose and grace, granted to us in Christ Jesus before time began, but now made visible through the appearing of our Savior Christ Jesus” (v. 9). All other religions say, “Do!” Man is saved by good works—giving, going to church, serving the poor, etc. However, the gospel says, “Done!” Christ did everything, and we can do nothing to be saved except believe (John 3:16). The fact that we can do nothing for our salvation is reiterated by the fact this grace was given to us before time began. Ephesians 1:4-5 says, “For he chose us in Christ before the foundation of the world that we may be holy and unblemished in his sight in love. He did this by predestining us to adoption as his sons through Jesus Christ, according to the pleasure of his will.”

4. The gospel is great because it was revealed through the historical person of Jesus.

In referring to our calling to salvation before time, Paul said, “but now made visible through the appearing of our Savior Christ Jesus” (v. 10). This gospel was fully revealed 2000 years ago when the Son of God came to the earth as a baby. He lived a perfect life, died on the cross for our sins, and resurrected from the dead. This gospel is a historical reality; it is not a myth. We have more historical proof of Christ’s resurrection than for the life of Julius Caesar.

5. The gospel is great because it tells us about the destruction of death.

Paul said that Christ “broke” the power of death (v. 10). Other versions say Christ “destroyed” or “abolished” death (v. 10). How did Christ destroy death? Obviously, people still die today including Christians. MacArthur’s comments are helpful:

Katargeō (abolish) literally means to render inoperative. It is not that death no longer exists or that believers are promised escape from it, unless they are raptured. But for believers, death is no longer a threat, no longer an enemy, no longer the end.2

For Christians, death has lost its sting (1 Cor 15:55); it is called gain (Phil 1:21). It is simply putting off our temporary tent to go to our eternal home (2 Cor 5:1). To be absent from the body means to be present with the Lord (2 Cor 5:8). Christ, through his death, delivered believers from the fear of death (Heb 2:15) and broke the power of death over us. Now death is just a passing through. This is an amazing gospel!

6. The gospel is great because it is the message of life and immortality.

Some see “life” and “immortality” as synonymous—referring to eternal life in heaven with God and Christ. However, it possibly refers to abundant “life” on the earth and “immortality” in heaven. Christ said, “I came that you might have life and life more abundantly” (John 10:10, paraphrase). This includes knowing God (John 17:3) and having his peace in all situations (John 14:27).

When Christ came, he brought to “light” life and immortality—meaning this wasn’t fully understood in the Old Testament. They knew of heaven and the place of the dead, but not in the clarity that we understand it now. In the Old Testament, these realities were in the shadows, but in the New Testament they were brought into the light. The gospel teaches about abundant life on earth and eternal life in heaven.

One of the reasons that we should be unashamed of our faith, in an antagonistic world, is because of how wonderful the gospel is. It is the message of salvation, holiness, grace, Jesus, the destruction of death, and the offer of life and immortality.

Application Question: Why is the gospel needed for believers to continually hear and not just unbelievers? How does the gospel encourage you to be unashamed?

To Be Unashamed, We Must Remember Our Duty to Share the Gospel

For this gospel I was appointed a preacher and apostle and teacher. Because of this, in fact, I suffer as I do. But I am not ashamed, because I know the one in whom my faith is set and I am convinced that he is able to protect what has been entrusted to me until that day.

2 Timothy 1:11-12

Paul shares how God uniquely called him to proclaim the gospel as a herald (or preacher), an apostle, and a teacher. This description of Paul’s divine duty was a reminder to both Timothy and us of our duty to faithfully proclaim the gospel. If we don’t share it, nobody else will. Stott said this about Paul’s various roles in relation to the gospel:

Perhaps we can relate the three offices of ‘apostle’, ‘preacher’ and ‘teacher’ by saying that the apostles formulated the gospel, preachers proclaim it like heralds, and teachers instruct people systematically in its doctrines and in its ethical implications.3

Heralds were sent by a king to proclaim his message with his authority. We do the same every time we share the gospel. As teachers, we explain the applications and implications of the gospel. We may not be apostles, in that we are not a part of the historical group who saw the resurrected Christ and proclaimed his resurrection with signs and wonders (cf. 1 Cor 15:7-9, 2 Cor 12:12); however, the word “apostle” literally means “sent one”, and we’ve all been sent by our Lord to proclaim the gospel. In the Great Commission, Christ said:

“All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

Matthew 28:18-20

We must be unashamed of our faith because it is our duty to proclaim it. If we don’t proclaim it, nobody else will. We are heralds, teachers, and “sent ones.” Christ sends us out like sheep among wolves (Matt 10:16), and yet we must faithfully discharge our duty.

Application Question: Why is the gospel so offensive to people? What is your experience with sharing the gospel?

To Be Unashamed, We Must Invest in God

Because of this, in fact, I suffer as I do. But I am not ashamed, because I know the one in whom my faith is set and I am convinced that he is able to protect what has been entrusted to me until that day.

2 Timothy 1:12

Paul said that his suffering for the gospel was no cause for shame because he knew that God was able to protect what he had entrusted with him until that day—the day of Christ’s coming. The word “know” Paul uses “carries the idea of knowing with certainty.”4 The word “entrusted” can be translated “deposited.” It was a banking term. Paul knew with certainty that God was the best person to trust and invest in. He therefore would never suffer ultimate loss or shame, and neither will we.

Interpretation Question: What had Paul entrusted with God and why?

It could refer to several things:

1. Paul had entrusted his life with God.

When people put money in a bank, their hope is to not only protect the money but also to make a profit. Paul may be referring to that here. Christ was the best person to entrust his life with. Yes, other places were safer in one sense, but by investing in Christ, he would experience God’s best. Even if he died, God would resurrect him. If he didn’t die, God would continue to use his life. For these reasons, Paul could say, “For to me, living is Christ and dying is gain” (Phil 1:21). To live means to serve and know Christ and to die is to serve and know him more. It is gain.

This is true for us as well. There is nothing better than living for Christ even if it leads to persecution and earthly loss. God is able to make up that loss either on earth or in heaven. The wisely invested life will be a life full of earthly and heavenly rewards.

Christ said this to Peter who wondered what the disciples would receive for leaving all to follow Christ. In Mark 10:29–30, Christ replied,

”I tell you the truth, there is no one who has left home or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or fields for my sake and for the sake of the gospel who will not receive in this age a hundred times as much—homes, brothers, sisters, mothers, children, fields, all with persecutions—and in the age to come, eternal life.

The reward for investing our lives in Christ includes open homes, new family members, new lands to serve, persecution, and eternal life. But with these persecutions for the faith, there will be great heavenly reward as taught in the Beatitudes (Matt 5:10-12).

2. Paul had entrusted his work with God.

Obviously, Paul had given his life to preaching and teaching the gospel, founding churches, disciplining believers, and correcting false teachers. However, none of this work would be loss. Even when the gospel was rejected, false teaching prospered, and persecutions came, he could trust the fruit of his ministry to God. In 1 Corinthians 3:6, Paul said, “I planted, Apollos watered, but God caused it to grow.” Fruitfulness comes from God.

We can entrust our work to the Lord as well. He will draw people to himself in his time, set them free from strongholds, and deliver them from spiritual lethargy. God makes things grow. Therefore, we should not be ashamed when things seem fruitless. When Christ died, there were only 120 devoted followers waiting and praying in a room. However, after the Spirit fell at Pentecost, 3000 repented and were saved. We must deposit our work in the bank of Christ and leave the results to God.

There is no need to be ashamed of our investment in the Lord. If we give our life and work to the Lord, he will maximize them. We will be rewarded both on earth and heaven. He will produce fruit for his name’s sake.

3. Paul had entrusted the gospel with God.

Some believe that Paul was referring specifically to the gospel. In 2 Timothy 1:14, Paul challenges Timothy, “Protect that good thing entrusted to you, through the Holy Spirit who lives within us.” Paul sought to guard and protect the gospel, and he challenged Timothy to continue that work. However, even if it was God’s will for Paul and Timothy to die because of persecution, the gospel would still go forward. God was trustworthy (v. 12). And certainly, we see this fruit today. The Roman Empire that killed Paul disintegrated, but the gospel didn’t, and it never will. It is still moving triumphantly throughout the earth today. Though each of our lives will one day end (at least in its present state), the message we share is eternal and will never cease.

William MacDonald said this about the various views concerning the “deposit”:

Perhaps it is best to take the expression in its broadest sense. Paul was persuaded that his entire case was in the best of hands. Even as he faced death, he had no misgivings. Jesus Christ was his Almighty Lord, and with Him there could be no defeat or failure. There was nothing to worry about. Paul’s salvation was sure, and so was the ultimate success of his service for Christ here on earth.5

Have you invested your life, your work, and the gospel in God’s hands? If so, God will use your investment for his glory. In God’s eyes, it is the invested life that is the successful life.

Application Question: What keeps people from fully investing their lives with God? Was there a certain point in your life when you decided to go “all in” with God? Describe that time and the effects of that decision.

To Be Unashamed, We Must Keep Sound Teaching

Hold to the standard of sound words that you heard from me and do so with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. Protect that good thing entrusted to you, through the Holy Spirit who lives within us.

2 Timothy 1:13-14

Finally, Paul instructs Timothy to “hold” to sound words (or teaching) with faith and love. It can also be translated “hold fast” or “keep.” The word “sound” means “healthy.” We must hold fast to healthy teaching, as it’s possible to lose it or allow it to be corrupted. We must guard it as a deposit with the help of the Holy Spirit. In Matthew 5:19, Christ said that those who disobeyed his teaching and taught others to disobey it would ultimately be called least in the kingdom of heaven. Believing and teaching unhealthy doctrine ultimately leads to shame before God and others. Therefore, to be unashamed on earth and in heaven, we must keep sound teaching.

Interpretation Question: What does Paul mean by challenging Timothy to keep the pattern of sound teaching?

1. To keep sound teaching, we must understand it through disciplined study.

In 2 Timothy 2:15, Paul says, “Make every effort to present yourself before God as a proven worker who does not need to be ashamed, teaching the message of truth accurately.” Many who profess Christ don’t really know what God’s Word teaches. For others, they are lazy in their study and therefore mishandle God’s Word—causing others to stumble. This will lead to shame before others and ultimately God.

If we are going to be unashamed, we must understand God’s Word through disciplined study.

2. To keep sound teaching, we must obey it.

One of the main reasons people are ashamed of God and his words is because they don’t obey them. They feel hypocritical, and are often viewed as such, because their lifestyle doesn’t match their professed belief. If we are to be unashamed, we must practice what God’s Word says.

3. To keep sound teaching, we must test all teaching against God’s Word.

Paul told Timothy to keep Paul’s instruction as “the standard of sound words” (v. 13). The Greek word for “standard,” or it can be translated “pattern,” was used of “a writer’s outline or an artist’s rough sketch, which set the guidelines and standards for the finished work. The Christian’s standard is God’s Word, which encompasses the sound words” which Paul taught.6 God’s Word equips the man of God for all righteousness (2 Tim 3:17). Therefore, we should test parenting strategies, marriage customs, work norms, and cultural expectations against it—less we be led astray. In addition, we must test all teaching in the church against God’s Word. In Acts 17:11 (ESV), the Bereans were called “noble” because they tested Paul’s teachings against Scripture day and night. We must do the same. This will protect us from being ashamed about accepting unhealthy teaching, promoting it, or living it out.

4. To keep sound teaching, we must demonstrate faith and love.

Paul says to keep the pattern of sound teaching with “faith” and “love” (v. 13). “Faith” means both to believe God’s Word and to be faithful to it. “Love” means that we must love God’s Word. David said, “O, how I love your law!
All day long I meditate on it” (Psalm 119:97). First Peter 2:2 says that we must “yearn” for it like infants yearn for milk. If we love it, then we’ll study it, meditate on it, and share it. In addition, we must speak the truth to others in love (Eph 4:15). If we have faith without love, we become harsh Pharisees. But if we have love and no faith, then we become antinomians—touting freedom to sin.

Are you keeping the standard with faith and love?

5. To keep sound teaching, we must protect it.

When Paul says to “protect that good thing entrusted to you” (v. 14), he further clarifies what it means to “hold” or “keep” the standard of sound teaching (v. 13). Since false teaching abounds around the world, as it did in Ephesus, we must contend for the truth by exposing bad doctrine in order to protect others from it. By doing this, we protect sound doctrine from either decay or being lost. In addition, we protect sound teaching by sharing it with others, so they can obey it and also be kept from lies.

6. To keep sound teaching, we must rely on the Holy Spirit.

In verse 14, Paul adds that we must protect sound teaching “through the Holy Spirit who lives within us.” Only God’s Spirit can enable us to keep the pattern of sound words. We must depend on the Holy Spirit through prayer and a deepening relationship with Christ and his body. Like David, we must cry out for God to turn our eyes from worthless things and to preserve us by God’s Word (Psalm 119:37). We must rely on the Holy Spirit to help us discern what is false (1 John 2:27). We must rely on him to enable us to teach God’s Word and correct misinterpretations of it.

Are you keeping the pattern of sound teaching? Only by keeping God’s Word can we be unashamed before God and others. To accept and promote what is false always leads to shame.

Application Question: Why is it so difficult to keep the pattern of sound teaching in our lives, churches, and Christian organizations? How have you seen this pattern lost in many of our churches and Christian organizations? How do you feel God is calling you specifically to contribute to keeping the standard of sound teaching?

Conclusion

How can we be unashamed of our faith in a world that is increasingly antagonistic to Christ, his people, and his Word?

  1. To Be Unashamed, We Must Be Empowered by God’s Spirit
  2. To Be Unashamed, We Must Accept Suffering as from the Lord
  3. To Be Unashamed, We Must Remember That Others Are Suffering as well
  4. To Be Unashamed, We Must Remember the Greatness of the Gospel
  5. To Be Unashamed, We Must Remember Our Duty to Share the Gospel
  6. To Be Unashamed, We Must Invest in God
  7. To Be Unashamed, We Must Keep Sound Teaching

Copyright © 2017, 2018 (2nd Edition) Gregory Brown

Unless otherwise noted, the primary Scriptures used are taken from the NET Bible ® copyright © 1996-2016 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. All rights reserved.

Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Scripture quotations marked (ESV) are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® (ESV®) Copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. All rights reserved.

Scripture quotations marked (NLT) are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, Copyright © 1996, 2004, 2007 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Scripture quotations marked (NASB) are taken from the New American Standard Bible®, Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.

Scripture quotations marked (KJV) are from the King James Version of the Bible.

All emphases in Scripture quotations and commentary have been added.

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1 Wiersbe, W. W. (1996). The Bible exposition commentary (Vol. 2, pp. 241–242). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

2 MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (1995). 2 Timothy (p. 22). Chicago: Moody Press.

3 Stott, J. R. W. (1973). Guard the Gospel the message of 2 Timothy (p. 41). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

4 MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (1995). 2 Timothy (p. 25). Chicago: Moody Press.

5 MacDonald, W. (1995). Believers Bible Commentary: Old and New Testaments. (A. Farstad, Ed.) (p. 2112). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

6 MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (1995). 2 Timothy (p. 29). Chicago: Moody Press.

Related Topics: Christian Life, Issues in Church Leadership/Ministry

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