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13. The Priorities Of The Heavenly Citizen: Part Two (Colossians 3:15-17)

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“Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, since as members of one body you were called to peace. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and as you sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God. And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him” (Col. 3:15–17).

What are the priorities of a heavenly citizen, one who has been raised with Christ and seated in heavenly places (cf. Col. 3:1; Eph. 2:6)?

In Colossians 3:12–17, Paul has been teaching about the clothing of a believer as he referred to the attitudes that should mark a believer’s lifestyle. Believers should put on the clothes of compassion, kindness, patience, forgiveness, love, etc., to reflect their new heavenly position in Christ. He concludes his instructions on the clothing of the believer by giving three priorities. These priorities are the outermost garments of the heavenly citizen, those that cover all the others.1 It is clear that these are priorities because he spends more time on these than the other clothes.

The priority we considered previously was letting the peace of Christ rule in our hearts. The believer should let the peace of Christ rule in his life. It was never God’s will for the believer to be ruled and guided by fear and worry (cf. Phil. 4:6). Fear was a result of the fall (Gen. 3). It made Adam and Eve hide from God and hide from one another. It hindered man’s relationships and resulted in further sin. Instead of letting fear rule, we must let Christ’s peace rule, especially in decision–making.

We have an active role in this. It is something a believer does by an act of discipline. As taught in Philippians 4:6–9, we do this by rejecting fear, living in constant prayer, by thinking on what is right, and by practicing righteousness. We also let it rule by walking in unity with the body (Col. 3:15); discord will remove the Lord’s peace from our lives and others.

What else should be the priorities of a heavenly citizen? We will look at two more priorities in this lesson.

Big Question: What are the commands given in Colossians 3:16–17, and how are these achieved in the believer’s life?

The Heavenly Citizen Must Let The Word Of God Dwell Richly In Him

“Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and as you sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God” (Col. 3:16).

Interpretation Question: What does Paul mean by letting the Word of Christ dwell richly in us?

The next priority of a heavenly citizen is to let the Word of Christ dwell richly in him. What does Paul mean by letting the Word of Christ dwell richly, or abundantly, as it can be translated?

The word dwell” Paul used means to “to live in” or “to be at home.”2 It means to dwell as a resident rather than as a visitor. The problem with many Christians is that the Word of God is like a visitor rather than a resident. They visit the Word of God on occasion, but the Word of God is not living at home in them. It’s not something they are living and abiding in all the time.

The fact that he says “let” the Word of Christ dwell in us means we have an active part in this process. Many believe Paul is showing us how to let the Word of Christ dwell in us by the following characteristics in verse 16: teaching, worshipping, and giving thanks.

Application Question: How do we let the Word of God be at home in us as discerned from Colossians 3:16?

1. The Word Of Christ Becomes At Home In Us As We Study It.

One of the ways the Word of Christ becomes at home in us is by studying it. This is implied in the fact that Paul calls us to teach and admonish with all wisdom (v. 16). Anyone who teaches must, by necessity, study. To study means more than just reading; studying includes memorizing, researching, comparing Scripture with Scripture, etc., to come to a proper understanding.

To study the Bible you will need resources other than the Bible. This may be a shock to many people, but the reality is that because we are so far removed from the ancient context, many things can be misinterpreted or missed altogether.

For example, in order to understand the book of 1 Peter, knowing the early church was being persecuted by the Roman Emperor Nero greatly helps our comprehension of the book. They were being burned at the stake and thrown into the arena to be killed by lions; bloody meat was being placed on them so they would be torn up by dogs, etc. Knowing this helps us better understand the context of the book and its major theme: suffering.

In John 10, when Jesus says, “My sheep know my voice and they will not follow the voice of another” (vv. 3–5), it was readily understood by the original audience. This is because they had shepherds and sheep on every corner; however, many of us don’t. The eastern shepherd would often sing or make noises so the sheep would follow him. He knew all the sheep by name and they knew him. The sheep could distinguish the shepherd’s voice amidst other voices. Someone from our contemporary context might miss a great deal of what Christ meant in his shepherding metaphor.

Similarly in John 14:2–3, Christ said,

In my Father’s house are many rooms; if it were not so, I would have told you. I am going there to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be where I am.

In that context, Jesus’ words seem to reflect the ancient custom of a betrothed husband leaving his fiancée and going to his father’s house to prepare an extra room for them. In our context, when a couple gets married, they typically move out of the father’s house. But in that context, the bride would move in with the husband’s family, and to accommodate this the husband would build an extra room on the house.

Most of us would miss that metaphor if we were not using resources outside of the Bible to aid in our studying. These resources include commentaries, systematic theologies, concordances, etc. It takes work to study the Bible; however, the work is very rewarding. Proverbs 16:20 says, “Whoever gives thought to the word will discover good (ESV).

2. The Word Of Christ Becomes At Home In Us As We Sit Under Gifted Teachers.

Connected to the last point is the need for us to be taught by gifted teachers. Every teacher was once a student and in some way continues to be a student (cf. Matt. 10:24). In order for the Word of God to dwell richly in us, we must sit under strong teaching. Paul said that God gave us pastors and teachers so we all could come to “a unity in the faith.” Listen to what he said in Ephesians 4:11–13:

It was he who gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers, to prepare Gods people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ.

One of the reasons God gave gifted teachers was to help the Word of God dwell in us richly. This is why he gave James, John, Peter, and Paul. They were given to build up the body of Christ and to help us become mature in the faith. But his gifted teachers did not stop with the early church; they continue today. This includes pastors, small group leaders, professors, mentors, etc., all given for the purpose of helping us know the Word of God richly.

Now with this said, we have a responsibility to seek these gifted teachers in order for us to be trained. Not only do we have many gifted teachers, but we have their books, sermons, articles, podcasts, etc. Because of the Internet we have more resources to be trained than ever before.

The early church had a problem with access. Books were expensive and very few people owned Bibles. Therefore, the early church would read the Bible aloud for hours to equip the people.

But now that is not a problem. The problem is not access but interest. Sadly, we have lots of other amazing resources that sometimes draw us away from studying Scripture, like Facebook, movies, video games, TV, etc. Therefore, even though we have resources that the early church did not have, the church many times has less interest in taking advantages of gifted teachers and their resources that God has given us. If the Word is going to dwell richly in us, we must take advantage of the teachers God has given us.

What else must we do if the Word of God is going to be at home in us?

3. The Word Of Christ Becomes At Home In Us As We Teach The Word Of God.

One of the greatest ways to let the Word of Christ dwell richly in us is by teaching it. Paul seems to be referring to learning by teaching, specifically when he says, “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom” (v. 16). Teaching has always been the best way to learn. Teachers always learn more than those taught, and God has called for every believer to be a teacher. Listen to Mark 4:24–25:

‘Consider carefully what you hear,’ he continued. ‘With the measure you use, it will be measured to you—and even more. Whoever has will be given more; whoever does not have, even what he has will be taken from him.’

Jesus said, “Consider carefully what you hear, with the measure you use it, it will be measured unto you—and even more.” Did you hear that? “Even more” means that there will be overflow, abundance; it is the richness that Paul talks about in Colossians 3:16. Jesus said that when we “use” what we have been taught, it will be measured to us and even more.

When Christ talks about us faithfully using the Scripture, he is probably primarily referring to teaching it. In the context, after teaching the parable of the sower (Mark 4:1–20), he gives the metaphor of not hiding our lamp under a bowl or a bed, but putting it on a stand for all to see (v. 21). The lamp seems to refer to us sharing the Word of God, just as the sower of the seed did in the previous parable. God wants each one of us to teach the Word of God and not hide it under a bowl—probably referring to work—or under a bed—probably referring to laziness, two common hindrances to teaching God’s Word. We must faithfully teach the Word, and when we do more will be given to us. Therefore, those who have will get more, but those who do not have, even what they have is taken away (v. 25).

Paul said something similar to Philemon. Listen to what he said: “I pray that you may be active in sharing your faith, so that you will have a full understanding of every good thing we have in Christ” (Philem. 1:6). Paul prays for him to be active in sharing his faith because when he did, he would have a “full understanding of every good thing we have in Christ.” He gives a result clause. If we actively share our faith, God will give us a full understanding of every good thing we have in Christ—he will give us more. We must be teachers, and when we teach we will have abundance.

The person who comes to church every Sunday and simply listens but doesn’t do anything with it actually loses even what he had. He then has to be retaught what he learned (cf. Heb. 5:11–12). Jesus said, “Whoever does not have, even what he has will be taken away.”

This happens in everyday life. If you learn a language and never use it, you forget it. It’s like that with the Word of God but even worse. It’s possible to listen to the Word of God so much without responding that it eventually hardens our hearts, making it impossible to respond. That’s what happened with Israel. They constantly heard the Word of God but did nothing with it. This led to the hardening of their hearts (cf. Matt. 13:10–15). Look at what is said about Israel during the call of Isaiah:

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send me!’ He said, ‘Go and tell this people: “Be ever hearing, but never understanding; be ever seeing, but never perceiving.” Make the heart of this people calloused; make their ears dull and close their eyes. Otherwise they might see with their eyes, hear with their ears, understand with their hearts, and turn and be healed.’ Then I said, ‘For how long, O Lord?’ And he answered: ‘Until the cities lie ruined and without inhabitant, until the houses are left deserted and the fields ruined and ravaged, until the LORD has sent everyone far away and the land is utterly forsaken’ (Isa. 6:8–12).

God commissioned Isaiah to make the hearts of the Israelites calloused (v. 10). How was Isaiah to do this? All he was going to do was faithfully preach the Word of God, and the Word would harden hearts because they would not respond. He was called to preach until God brought judgment.

It has been said, “The same sun that softens the ice, hardens the clay.” Therefore, one of the ways we allow the Word of God to dwell in us richly is by faithfully using the Word. We use it not only by obeying it, but by teaching it to others, and the measure we use, it shall be measured back and even more.

4. The Word Of Christ Becomes At Home In Us As We Sing And Listen To Worship.

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and as you sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God (Col. 3:16).

After talking about teaching, Paul says one of the ways the Word of God becomes at home in us is through worship as we sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs. Music has always been a means of teaching. For many of us, we can’t say our ABC’s unless we sing it in a song. Similarly, worship is meant to be a means of teaching about God’s grace. The person who lives in worship—the teachings of Scripture put to song—will be letting “the word of Christ dwell in them richly.”

5. The Word Of Christ Dwells Richly In Us As We Are Thankful.

Paul said, “As you sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God.” Not only must we worship to let the Word of Christ dwell richly in us, but we also must have the right heart—a heart of gratitude. This is important because the Word of Christ cannot dwell in any other type of heart.

Listen to what Christ taught about how our hearts affect our ability to receive the Word of God in the parable of the sower. He said this about the thorny ground: “The one who received the seed that fell among the thorns is the man who hears the word, but the worries of this life and the deceitfulness of wealth choke it, making it unfruitful” (Matt. 13:22). He said that the worries of this life become thorns in our heart that choke the Word and make it unfruitful. A person who is worrying about the future, worrying about the past, and complaining about the present is a person who the Word of God will be unfruitful in. It cannot be at home in that type of heart. Only a grateful heart can truly receive and bear fruit through the Word of God.

Are you a grateful person? Or are you a worrier and a complainer? The Word of God cannot dwell in an ungrateful heart. We must practice thankfulness in every situation if we are going to prioritize letting the Word of God dwell in us richly.

Characteristics

Observation Question: What are the results or characteristics of a person in whom the Word of God dwells richly? What do they look like?

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and as you sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God. And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him (Col. 3:16–17).

How do we know if and when the Word of God is dwelling in us richly? After telling us to let the Word of Christ dwell in us richly, Paul gives us a description of how to do this: through teaching, worshipping, giving thanks, etc. However, many people see these descriptors not as a means to an end, but as characteristics of a person whom the Word of God dwells in richly. I think they are both. The Word of God dwells in you more as you teach and worship, and it also is a natural overflow of someone whom the Word of God dwells in. They want to teach God’s Word and worship, and they are thankful. We will look at these characteristics a little deeper.

The characteristics of the Word of Christ dwelling in us richly are:

1. Characteristic Of Teaching And Admonishing One Another With All Wisdom.

One of the characteristics of the Word of God dwelling richly in a person is that they will naturally begin to teach the Word of God. When you are studying the Word of God and he is showing you new things, it is natural for you to want to share it with other people. Jesus said, “Out of the abundance of the heart, the mouth speaks” (Luke 6:45). When the Word of God is in your heart, it will naturally come out.

Not only will you share it, you will also be willing at times to “admonish” others. This means to rebuke or challenge people when they are in sin. Teaching is the positive aspect of sharing the Word of God and admonishing is the negative aspect. This was one of the primary roles of prophets in the Old Testament. They taught Israel where they were disobeying God’s Word and called them back to obedience. It also included warning them of chastisement from God.

Let us recognize that this is still a real need today. God was not a God of wrath in the Old Testament and a God of grace in the New. God is the same today, yesterday, and forever. He is unchanging. His wrath or discipline is an outflow of his love. The writer of Hebrews said, “Because the Lord disciplines those he loves, and he punishes everyone he accepts as a son” (12:6).

If we are going to teach God’s Word, we must faithfully admonish people of their sin and warn them of God’s discipline. God punishes everyone whom he calls a son.

Paul not only includes teaching and admonishment, but he also includes “all wisdom.” Wisdom is the application of knowledge. Wisdom is the “So what?” when we teach the Word of God. We need to be able to apply it to various situations. It must be applied to a child, to an adult, and to the elderly. It must be applied in trial, in peace, and in prosperity. Christians must learn to apply the Scripture as they teach people in various cultures and situations.

The good thing is that this wisdom is simply an overflow of knowing the Word of God. God gives wisdom to the person who seeks to know God’s Word. Psalm 19:7 says, “The law of the LORD is perfect, reviving the soul. The statutes of the LORD are trustworthy, making wise the simple.”

The statues of the Lord make the simple wise. We live in a world where people cannot make decisions. They lack wisdom to discern the best course of action. This is part of the reason for such a rise in people seeking psychologists and psychics. People don’t know what to do. Look at Hollywood. Almost every movie star has not only a shrink but also a psychic. Nobody can make decisions any more. Everybody’s screaming, “Tell me what to do!”

Do you know that the Word of God makes people wise? Scripture calls God the “only wise God” (Rom. 16:27). When you study his Word, it gives you wisdom to make decisions and to help other people make decisions. When the Word of God dwells richly in you, you will teach and admonish with all wisdom.

2. A Characteristic Of The Word Of Christ Dwelling Richly In Us Is Worship.

Another characteristic of the Word of Christ dwelling richly in us is worship. Look at what Paul says: “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and as you sing psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God” (Col. 3:16).

A person whose life is overflowing with Scripture will naturally be a worshiper. Consider the life of David. He was the Psalmist of Israel, the one who wrote the hymnal book for the people of God. Guess what the first chapter of the hymnal book says? It says “blessed” is the man who “delights in God’s law and on it he meditates day and night” (Ps. 1:2). Guess what the longest chapter in the hymnal of Israel says? “How I long for your precepts! (v. 40).” “Open my eyes to see wonderful things from your law (v. 18).” Psalm 119 is the longest chapter in the Bible, and in it David talks about how wonderful God’s Word is.

True worship does not exist because true love for the Word of God does not exist. Go into churches all around the world and you will find dead worship. The worship is dead because love for God’s Word is dead. David essentially says in the first chapter of the hymnal, “If you’re going to worship God, you must delight in his Word.” It is no different for us.

The natural overflow of a life in the Word of God is a life that wants to honor God. Paul describes different types of worship music that the believer sings:

  • Psalms: Israel and the early church often would put the Psalms to music, even as many worship artists do today. When we sing, “Open the eyes of my heart Lord; Open the eyes of my heart,” we are simply singing Psalm 119:18. Somebody took the inspired Word of God and made a song out of it.
  • Hymns: Hymns are simply praise songs to God. They are not Psalms, but they contain Scripture and/or rich theology. It is simply worship we sing to the Lord.
  • Spiritual Songs: Spiritual songs typically are songs about a personal experience or testimony about God.

Sadly, in many of our churches there is a war over these types of songs. They say, “We can only use hymns,” and therefore reject any worship that is of a more personal or experiential in nature (spiritual songs), or they reject songs that use contemporary rhythms.

Listen, we have no right to sing to God anything that would contradict Scripture and not bring honor to him. But within the bounds of Scripture and genuine Christian experience there is liberty. Let the heart that is overflowing with the Word of God sing his praises.

3. A Characteristic Of The Word Of Christ Dwelling Richly In Us Is A Heart Of Gratitude.

This is a major theme in the book of Colossians. Paul said in Colossians 1:12 that he was praying for them to have power to be patient and persevere, and for them to joyfully give “thanks to the Father.” In Colossians 3:15 he called for the church to let the peace of God rule in their hearts and to “be thankful.” Similarly, 1 Thessalonians 5:18 says, “Give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.”

Listen, a heart of gratitude is not only a mark of a person that is filled with the Word of God, it is also a mark of a true Christian. Listen to how Paul describes unbelievers: “For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened” (Rom. 1:21).

Paul describes unbelievers as neither glorifying God nor giving thanks to him. The unbeliever says, “I don’t need God.” The religious unbeliever says, “I can earn my salvation.” Therefore, theirs is a lifestyle of not giving thanks. They complain about the boss, they are bitter about friends and family, or they boast in themselves. Like the Pharisees, they give thanks for their good works and in the same breath criticize others (Luke 18:11–12). But the true believer is identified by thanksgiving to God.

And this thanksgiving grows by allowing the Word of God to dwell richly in us.

Application Question: In what ways have you seen or experienced teaching, worship and thanksgiving increase or decrease based on your time in the Word of God?

Compared To Being Filled With The Spirit

Interpretation Question: What can we learn by considering the similarities in the characteristics of the person who lets the Word of Christ dwell richly in them and the person who is filled with the Spirit in Ephesians 5:18–19?

Another thing we should consider about these characteristics is how similar they are to the characteristics of being filled with the Spirit. Look at what Ephesians 5:18–20 says:

Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery. Instead, be filled with the Spirit. Speak to one another with psalms, hymns and spiritual songs. Sing and make music in your heart to the Lord, always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

What does it mean to be filled with the Spirit? It means to be controlled by God’s Spirit and to be empowered by him. In the Old Testament, when a person was equipped to do God’s work, the Spirit of God came upon them. In the same way, to be filled with the Spirit means to be empowered for whatever ministry God has called us to do. Most Christians lack the power of God in their lives to defeat sin, to evangelize, or to serve because they are not filled with the Spirit.

It is clear by looking at both of these texts side by side that the characteristics are almost identical. The characteristics of being filled with the Spirit and with the Word of God are both worship and giving thanks.

This essentially means they are the same. To be filled with the Word of God is to be filled with the Spirit. The Word of God was inspired by the Spirit, and therefore to study the Word of God is the way the Spirit fills and controls us.

Why do so many Christians lack power to break lust, anger, or discouragement in their lives? It’s because they are not being filled with the Spirit. Why are they are not being filled? It’s because they are not daily letting the Word of Christ be at home in them. They are not faithfully obeying, studying, and teaching it to others, and therefore lack the filling that comes from that lifestyle.

Why does the church suffer from powerlessness in general—a lack of power to reach the world and a lack of power to bring change in the culture? It lacks power because it lacks being filled with God’s Word, which brings the power of the Holy Spirit.

Paul, the author of both of these texts, no doubt wants us to see the connection between these two disciplines. In order to be empowered by God to do his work, we must let the Word of God dwell richly in us. Lord, fill us with your Spirit; fill us with your Word.

Application Question: In what ways is God calling you to daily practice letting the Word of God dwell in you richly? What are some Bible study techniques that you use or recommend to others?

The Heavenly Citizen Must Do Everything To The Glory Of God

“And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him” (Col. 3:17).

What is the final priority of a heavenly citizen? The final and overarching priority in everything we do is to bring glory to God. Paul says that whatever we do, in speech or action, it should all be done in the name of the Lord Jesus. Paul says something similar in 1 Corinthians 10:31: “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.”

This is important to hear because it is very common for Christians to separate the spiritual and the secular. Church attendance is something we offer to God, daily devotions are something we offer to God, but school, work, and friendships are separate. No, this is not right. As heavenly citizens, everything we do should be done in the name of the Lord Jesus, for his glory.

When Paul says to do it in the name of the Lord Jesus, the word “name” does not simply mean something that we call someone. “Name”, in Hebrew thought, reflected one’s character. Therefore, to do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus meant to glorify him and reflect his characteristics.

I must reflect Christ’s love in serving others. I must reflect his perseverance in difficult times. I must reflect his joy and rest in my leisure and entertainment. Everything I do can and should give glory to God and reflect his characteristics.

Application Question: How do we do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus more specifically?

1. Believers Do Everything In The Name Of The Lord Jesus By Submitting To Him In Every Work.

We get further clarity on this later in Colossians. Look at what Paul says:

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving (Col. 3:23–24).

Paul says we should work at everything as though we are working for the Lord and not for men. It is ultimately God we are serving, not ourselves, friends, teachers, employers, or parents. This is one of the ways we do everything in the name of Christ: by submitting it to him.

2. Believers Do Everything In The Name Of The Lord Jesus By Working With All Their Heart.

Again in Colossians 3:23, Paul says: “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.” God looks at the heart when he surveys man; he looks at our heart in everything we do. Are we giving him our best? Are we working with passion and joy? This is one of the ways we do all in the name of Christ. We see this similarly in 1 Corinthians 13:1–3:

If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and surrender my body to the flames, but have not love, I gain nothing.

Paul says that if the service doesn’t have the right heart attitude, it is worthless to God. When we don’t work heartily (with our soul), it dishonors the name of Christ.

3. Believers Do Everything In The Name Of The Lord Jesus By Giving Thanks To Him.

“And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him” (Col. 3:17).

This is the primary way we do everything in the name of the Lord in this context. We do it by being thankful, again a major theme in the book of Colossians. Paul really encouraged these Christians to be thankful, which probably implies that the attack on this church from the Gnostic cult had probably robbed them of their joy. He is trying to stir up gratitude by reminder, and we need to be reminded of this as well since we often lose a spirit of thankfulness. The glory of God is always on the heart and mind of a heavenly citizen, and we glorify him most when we live thankful lives—thankful for his salvation, thankful for his good gifts, and even thankful for trials we go though (cf. Rom. 5:3; James 1:2). Lord, we thank you because you are good.

Application Question: What things commonly distract you from doing everything for the glory of God? How is God calling you to better glorify his name in your endeavors?

Conclusion

What are the priorities of heavenly citizens, those who are seated with Christ in heavenly places?

  • The heavenly citizen must let the peace of Christ rule in his heart. Whatever removes the peace of Christ should be rejected. Christ wants to guide us in our decisions through his peace.
  • The heavenly citizen must let the Word of Christ dwell richly in his heart. Is the Word of Christ richly dwelling in you? Are you a teacher, a worshiper, and a thankful person?
  • The heavenly citizen must do everything to glorify Christ. There is no separation between the spiritual and the secular. The lordship and glory of Christ must pervade every aspect of our lives.

Copyright © 2015 Gregory Brown


1 J. F. MacArthur Jr., MacArthur New Testament Commentary: Colossians. (Chicago: Moody Press, 1992), 157.

2 J. F. MacArthur Jr., MacArthur New Testament Commentary: Colossians. (Chicago: Moody Press, 1992), 158.

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