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Romans

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This 108 part expository study of Romans was preached at Flagstaff Christian Fellowship in 2010-2013. Audio and manuscripts are available for each lesson.

Related Topics: Equip, Hamartiology (Sin), Regeneration, Justification, Sanctification, Soteriology (Salvation), Spiritual Life

Lesson 6: The Kingdom of the Covenants, Part 1 (Luke 1:67-80)

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In part one of a two-part message, a first look is taken at the prophesy of Zechariah, the father of John the Baptist, following his son’s birth. Herein, we observe Him extolling God for His goodness and recounting the faithfulness of the Lord to His promises. In light of such, Pastor Daniel emphasizes the fact that God’s subjects are ambassadors of His present and future kingdom. They are kingdom people no matter what kingdom they temporarily find themselves in. Questions then are answered concerning what it means to live with a dual (earthly and eternal) citizenship. It has been the challenge of the faithful throughout the centuries, and so in order to understand our responsibilities to obey the Lord today, an examination of how former saints operated in and under the various covenants revealed throughout the Scriptures is instructive. Zechariah makes reference to the Davidic covenant, revealing God’s kingdom as a political kingdom. He furthermore makes mention of the Abrahamic covenant, one in which God’s kingdom is seen as a spiritual kingdom. And then there is the new covenant wherein God’s kingdom is a proclaimed kingdom.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Covenant, Kingdom

Lesson 7: The Kingdom of The Covenants, Part 2 (Luke 1:67-80)

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Part two of a two-part message continues to look at the praise of God through the mouth of John the Baptist’s father, Zechariah. Reviewing the covenants looked at the previous week (Davidic, Abraham, and New), the point is reemphasized that God’s subjects are ambassadors of His present and future kingdom and exist as kingdom people no matter what kingdom they are temporarily in. In further applying this truth we learn: 1.) God’s kingdom is not the current worldly system we find ourselves a part of, and so we must be careful not to confuse the two. 2.) God’s kingdom has begun and so we work to establish kingdom principles. 3.) God has placed us in this world and we have real obligations to current worldly kingdoms. 4.) God calls us to announce and anticipate His kingdom. Faithful Christians find themselves in a place where their allegiance to this temporal kingdom is sometimes questioned because of their superior allegiance to God’s kingdom. The charge is then given for believers to never find such allegiances reversed.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Covenant, Kingdom, Spiritual Life

Lesson 8: Christmas versus the Birth of the Savior (Luke 2:1-21)

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The birth of Jesus Christ as recorded in Luke 2 is a well-known account that is also commonly accompanied by its own set of fictional details, details that become part of the celebration and wonder that many grew up associating with this season. Because of this, we can sometimes lose sight of what God is trying to teach us through this important text. The good news proclaimed by the angels is what we would do well to carry with us, a message informing everyone that the virgin birth of Jesus Christ, in which full divinity was united with full humanity, is good news because it provides us peace with God. We hear in this statement a number of points to dwell on. Concerning the virgin birth, there is an urge to consider the humanity of the divine Christ who is able to identify with us. In reference to the “good news,” consideration is given to the fact that the birth of Jesus proclaims He is the focus of God’s sovereign plan of redemption. And finally, dwelling on the realization that through Christ we have the opportunity of peace with God, we are reminded of how Jesus’s coming to this earth is a proclamation of the salvation available to all.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Christmas, Christology, Soteriology (Salvation)

Lesson 9: Rise or Fall (Luke 2:21-40)

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Whether we rise or fall, in the ultimate sense, depends entirely on what we say about Jesus Christ. The text at hand reveals such a truth to the reader as the life and words of a man named Simeon are put on display. He was, like Zechariah and Elizabeth, a righteous and devout man who was looking for the salvation that God would bring to His people. Having been led by the Holy Spirit to the temple, he received the promise of beholding the newborn Messiah before His death. This account reminds us of the importance of the following admonitions that we, 1.) Know that Jesus is God’s provision for salvation. 2.) Trust in Jesus for salvation. 3.) Value Jesus more than anything. 4.) Fear the consequences of rejecting Jesus. Then finally, through a look at the actions of the prophetess Anna in this same passage, we observe the charge to, 5.) Proclaim God’s salvation to others. This is a message for those who need rescuing, or, put another way, this is a message for everyone.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Soteriology (Salvation)

Lesson 10: Christ-like Prioritization (Luke 2:41-52)

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Living in a world where there is always more that could be done, with internal and external pressures urging a certain prioritization, we would do well to consider the example of the twelve-year-old Jesus in the temple. In looking at this text, we are encouraged by Pastor Daniel to maintain the focus that, “You will always be able to accomplish what God calls you to do.” To help us to understand this statement rightly, four truths are given to help guide us into the application of this text and boost our worship of God in the process. 1.) You cannot accomplish everything in life—don’t try to! 2.) You may cause pain to others as you follow God—prepare for it! 3.) You may open yourself up to the criticism of others as you follow God—deal with it! And returning to the original encouragement, 4.) You are always able to accomplish what god calls you to do—do it! Within this message, listeners are neither directed to or away from specific ministries but instead encouraged toward deeper ministry in general.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Basics for Christians, Character of God, Christology, Spiritual Gifts, Spiritual Life

Lesson 11: The Call to True Repentance, Part 1 (Luke 3:1-20)

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The way in which people are told of their need for a Savior often varies (unfortunately) not only in exact wording but also in content. The resulting problem is that a church building can be full of people who are either frustrated in their new walks with God, or they are altogether unconverted, having never understood the gospel in the first place. John the Baptist did not leave much to question in his presentation of the truth; he called people to repentance in a way that did not minimize sin and judgment. He recognized, through the Spirit’s illumination, the need for people to be rescued from their hopeless plights and so found no reason to sugarcoat his message. In this message we see that the call to repentance, 1) is proclaimed by God to lost people, 2) is accompanied by the promise of the forgiveness of sins, 3) is given boldly so that men and women will know why they must repent, 4) bears fruit in the hearts of those who respond to it by faith, 5) points people to the lordship of Jesus Christ, and 6) will be rejected by many. Such a framework aids the believer in taking the truth of the gospel to a lost world.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Hamartiology (Sin), Soteriology (Salvation)

Lesson 12: The Call to True Repentance, Part 2 (Luke 3:1-20)

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Continuing the theme from last week... The way in which people are told of their need for a Savior often varies (unfortunately) not only in exact wording but also in content. The resulting problem is that a church building can be full of people who are either frustrated in their new walks with God, or they are altogether unconverted, having never understood the gospel in the first place. John the Baptist didn’t leave much to question in his presentation of the truth; he called people to repentance in a way that didn’t minimize sin and judgment. He recognized, through the Spirit’s illumination, the need for people to be rescued from their hopeless plights and so found no reason to sugarcoat his message. In this message we see that the call to repentance, 1) is proclaimed by God to lost people, 2) is accompanied by the promise of the forgiveness of sins, 3) is given boldly so that men and women will know why they must repent, 4) bears fruit in the hearts of those who respond to it by faith, 5) points people to the lordship of Jesus Christ, and 6) will be rejected by many. Such a framework aids the believer in taking the truth of the gospel to a lost world.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Evangelism, Hamartiology (Sin), Soteriology (Salvation)

Lesson 13: The Human and Divine Son of God

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Christ’s entrance into ministry is presented by Luke in such a way that we are able to see His credentials as the God-Man come to bring salvation to the world. In reading through His human lineage, we are gripped by the fact that all who had lived from the time of Adam likewise died after they had run their brief courses; sin brought death to all. But what is also noteworthy is that Jesus is announced, by the Father Himself and through the presence of the Holy Spirit, as someone new: the beloved Son of God. Pastor Daniel presents the message then that the observer should trust Jesus Christ, for He is the One who can provide you with the righteousness you need. He can do this because, 1) He is the Divine Son of God, and 2) He is the Human Son of God. As such, Christ brings divine righteousness to humans in their sin through His work on the cross. We are in immediate danger without Him; He is the hero we need for our rescue.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Christology, Soteriology (Salvation)

Lesson 14: Resisting the Deceitfulness of Sin (Luke 4:1-13)

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Jesus did not believe the lies that accompanied the temptations He encountered. This is what set Him apart as the only sinless human who has ever lived. We see the prime example of His resistance as He encountered the devil in the wilderness during His forty days of fasting. Jesus gives us great encouragement and hope…hope that perhaps there is a way to prevail in the struggle against the temptations to satisfy the endless lusts of our hearts. This message helps us to see how, in Christ, we too can resist the deceitful enticements of sin. We do such, not through our own power, for in that way we would only believe the lies that sin speaks. It is only in Christ that we can know the perfect truth that will set us free in this regard. Christ is the victor in His complete obedience to the Father, and He alone shows us the way into the same faithfulness to our God.

Summary by Seth Kempf, Bethany Community Church Staff

Related Topics: Christology, Hamartiology (Sin), Spiritual Life, Temptation

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